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Inner - new EP Released [28-Jan-2023]

Updated: Aug 5, 2023

Kicking off the New Year with a new [first] release from the group Enizzyo - Inner. This is made up of 4 tracks, representing the innermost moons of Jupiter



Metis

Originally designated S/1979 J 1, Metis is named for the first wife of Zeus who was swallowed by Zeus while pregnant with their first child. Zeus ate his wife because he feared the power of Metis' offspring. Their baby, Athena, leapt from Zeus' forehead fully grown as a result of this meal

Metis was discovered in March 1979 by the Voyager science team. Further information can be found here: In Depth | Metis – NASA Solar System Exploration



Adrastea

Adrastea is named after the Cretian nymph who took care of Zeus for his mother Rhea. Rhea entrusted her child to Adrastea to save him from her husband Cronus who would eat his children in order to maintain his rule

Adrastea was discovered in July 1979 by the Voyager science team. Further information can be found here: In Depth | Adrastea – NASA Solar System Exploration


Amalthea

Originally designated Jupiter V, Camille Flammarion suggested the name Amalthea for this moon. Amalthea is named for a naiad who nursed the newborn Jupiter. Amalthea is often depicted with a goat, whose milk is said to have fed the infant Jupiter

Amalthea was discovered Sept. 9, 1892 by Edward Emerson Barnard. Further information can be found here: In Depth | Amalthea – NASA Solar System Exploration


Thebe

The satellite originally called S/1979 J2 was ultimately named "Thebe," a name associated with Jupiter — or his Greek equivalent, Zeus — in a variety of ways in different myths. In one, Thebe was a nymph who was a love of Zeus. In another, she was an Egyptian king's daughter and a love of Jupiter.

Along with its sister inner moon, Metis, Thebe was exempted from the International Astronomical Union's requirement that prograde satellites (not counting the Galilean moons) receive names ending in "a"

Thebe was discovered in 1980 by the Voyager science team. Further information can be found here: In Depth | Thebe – NASA Solar System Exploration


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